Tidbits and Crumbs

DIY Wall Mounted Pot Rack

Wall Mounted Pot Rack

DIY Wall Mounted Pot Rack

Easy DIY Pot Rack Customized To Fit Your Space

Space is a little limited in my kitchen.  It’s a boring square and there’s really no place to put anything but the table. I’ve wanted a pot rack for so long, so I had to get creative. I was able to fashion a decent pot rack that is custom fit to the space that was available to me, mounted right to the wall. I’ll explain what I did, and I hope you find inspiration to create something like it for your own space.

Here’s a picture of the finished product. I made it before I thought of making a blog post out of it, so I didn’t take pictures of the steps. I’ll try to explain it as best I can. Feel free to ask questions if something is not clear.

I’m going to include some affiliate links in this post.  If you buy anything that you find in here, I’ll get a small commission.  (Or at least, so you can see what it looks like.)

Wall Mounted Pot Rack

Here’s a list of tools you will need:

• Drill, with drill bits and driver bits
Torpedo Level
• Miter or Circular saw (optional – you can probably get the wood cut at the store.)
• Stud finder (I prefer these magnetic ones)
• Tape measure
• Pencil
• Medium/Fine Sandpaper (just to smooth the cut ends of the dowels)

Here’s the material you will need:

• Piece of wood (mine is a 1×8, cut 30” long. You can change this measurement to suit your needs and space)
• Shelf brackets, sized appropriately for your piece of wood. You don’t want them too small.
• Hooks, as many as you need, make sure they are sized appropriately for your pots
• Screws
• Dowels (optional, if you want the lid rack on top. I used dowels sized 5/16, and cut them 5” long)
• Drywall anchors, if the shelf brackets are not centered over studs (they are often sold with screws included in the package.  I’m including a link to show you what they are, but I recommend going to a store and buying them so you can look at them to make sure the screws will fit your brackets.)
• L-shaped brace, to secure the rack to the stud. (see picture below)
• Wood glue
• Wood stain or paint, optional – (update detail – I have a new love, Keda Dye, that I’ve been playing around with.  I’ll do a post on it at some point, but you could use this product to blend your own dye and make the rack any color you want without covering the gorgeous grain of the wood with paint!)

Getting Started:

The first thing to do is consider the space. With my available area to mount it being so limited, I had to be sure it was far enough away from the cabinet that the door wouldn’t hit it, and far enough away from the door to downstairs that it wouldn’t interfere with the normal swing of it.

There was really only one way to place it, but the studs behind the wall weren’t where I needed them to be, so I used wall anchors. Make sure you know where yours are.

You also have to consider the size of the pots you intend to hang. I wanted to hang the smaller ones that I use most frequently. Depending on the pots you have, you may see fit to use a wider board, maybe a 1×10. Either way, decide on your desired length and cut your board.  Consider the lids also.  The width of the board should be greater than the radius of the largest lid.

After you get your board cut to the size you want, you might want to paint or stain it. You can wait till the end if you want, but this is the point where I stained mine.

Start Assembling:

Mark the placement of your brackets, and attach them to the board. I was nervous that they wouldn’t lay perfectly flush, so I used the tabletop to make sure I lined them up properly. The last thing I wanted was a gap between the shelf and the wall. You can put the brackets as far away from the end as you think looks best, just make sure they’re equidistant on both sides.

Lay it on the table as though it were on the wall, and lay out the pots you intend to hang on it. You need to determine placement of the hooks. You’ll notice on mine that I ran my hooks right down the middle of the board. In hindsight, I probably should have made them an inch further away from the wall – my omelet pan never rests right because it’s touching the wall. The hooks are 4 inches apart, which works for me.

You should drill small pilot holes for the hooks, just be careful not to drill all the way through.

Now is probably a good point to put the dowels on. Me? I lived with the rack without the dowels for a few weeks before it occurred to me that it would be a good idea to have something there for the lids. I had just been laying them there, which wasn’t a super bright idea. They slid off each other and onto the floor sometimes.

From the front view, the dowels are 3 inches apart. They would be OK squeezed a little closer together, but I wouldn’t put them any farther apart. From the side view, notice how the dowels are closer to the front of the shelf than to the wall, they’re not centered down the length of the board. I’m glad I did that.

Mark yours out according to what you need, considering the size of your pot lids. The center of the lid should fall between the dowels.

Make sure you have a drill bit capable of making a hole just big enough for the dowels, and really make sure not to drill all the way through. For mine I made space for more lids than pots, because I have some more pots in the cabinet. Put a dab of glue in each hole, and put the dowel in. Mine are not 100% perfectly straight. If yours comes out perfectly, hats off to you!!

Mounting It:

Getting it up on the wall by myself was a process. It would probably be faster if you had a few extra hands available, but I’ll tell you how I hung it myself.
Hold it up about where you want it, and mark only the spot where the top left screw will go.

If it’s in the stud, drill your pilot hole and screw in your screw, making sure to leave it sticking out enough to hang the bracket.

If it’s not in the stud, put your anchor in the wall before the screw.
Put your torpedo level on the shelf, then hook the bracket onto the screw, and find where it’s perfectly horizontal.

Mark the spot where the top right screw needs to be.
Take the shelf down and add the second screw to the wall.
Hang the shelf back up, tighten those two screws, and add the 2 bottom screws.

I added this L brace for additional stability. None of the screws in the brackets were put into a stud, so I attached this brace to the only stud available. Since my pot rack is above eye level, I added it to the top side where it can hide among the lids and no one will ever notice it.

This pot rack is relatively light duty. I’m reluctant to hang my cast iron cookware on it. Not saying you can’t, just saying I’m a Nervous Nellie and I’m afraid to. If you’ll be using particularly heavy cookware, I suggest making sure it is directly secured to at least 2 studs and use beefier hooks.

So, thanks for reading this! It’s the first of my blog post drafts that I actually completed!  I was super proud of this little project when I first made it, because I did it without a plan. Hey, if you can visualize it, you can do it, right??

If you’re into DIYing Kitchen Solutions, check out the Pasta Drying Rack I installed right underneath a cabinet.

Did you come up with a custom storage solution customized to your space?

Tell me about it!

 

 

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Originally posted 2017-09-01 14:22:28.

12 comments

    1. I know!! I have 2 cast iron pans under there now, plus the broiling pan that came with the stove and that’s it!! If you make one, I’d love to see a picture!!

  1. Thank you for sharing this great post! It looks fabulous and such an easy guide. We have very little space in our kitchen and have something similar in use, but this looks much more warm and homely and would fit our style better.

  2. I’m glad you mentioned the option of putting dowels on if you want the lid rack on top. We are trying to find space anywhere we can in the kitchen just because it is really small. We’ll have to go see if we can pick up a rack and have somebody mount it in the future.

    1. It was really easy, just a pine board and some shelf brackets, with the hooks and dowels. Glad you like it!! It’s one of my favorite things in my kitchen!

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